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Tuesday, 11 December 2012

A Jumbo Parcel

Well, I finally managed to get my camera back from wherever my daughter had left it (in the bottom of a bowl of avocado dip by the look of it - that's what I'm telling myself the green gunk is anyway, the alternative is too horrible to contemplate) and so we can get going again.


Here is a trumpeting herd of Minifigs PB range Indian pachyderms that arrived via the Royal Mail this morning in a rather festive looking box.

And here is one of the PB three figure Indian crews. The elephant driver seems to be clutching a small axe, possibly to dispose of the beast when it goes mental, though the erudite Mr Elsden reckons it may just be a version of the driver's riding crop that has gone a bit wrong.

I think I have at least 20 Indian elephants now, which may mean it is time to stop. Though I wouldn't bank on it.

7 comments:

  1. Help, help! A horrible Heffalump! A horde of horrible Heffalumps!

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  2. Good to have you back on the air. no day is complete without a dose of PP.

    GH

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  3. There is no such thing as too many elephants.

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  4. Nice looking beasts. More elephanty looking than many wargame ones.

    I thought Mahouts carried a sort of metal hook for directing the beastie, a hook with a spike on the end.

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  5. Indeed Ross, I don't believe that the 'ankush' has changed too much over the centuries (although this needs checking, must be a temple carving somewhere !)- this looks rather like it was intended to be something of the sort ?

    All the best,
    Nick

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  6. As you pointed out Nick the rider on the Funken inspired S Range armoured elephant has an even larger version - more like a billhook.

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  7. Strangely, the Funckens’ drawing on which the Minifig was based shows a perfectly ‘normal’ ankush, as do both the Phil Barker and Duncan Head editions of Armies and the Macedonian and Punic Wars. The one Indian sculpture I could find before breakfast (!) showed something similar, but with hooks at both ends.

    Minifigs may just have used a flight of fancy for the ‘armoured’ elephant driver’s cross between an ankush and a medieval halberd, and we are left still wondering what they intended for the unarmoured Indian mahout.

    Best wishes,
    Nick

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